Beyond the EMR: 3 Questions You Need to Ask to Hire a Safe Builder

By Amye Carle, Director of Risk Management

Imagine getting behind the wheel to take a driving test before getting your license. Your instructor is watching closely to make sure you do everything on their checklist. Turn signal before turning? Check. Come to a complete stop at a stop sign? Check. The instructor is going to assess your safe driving skills based on your ability to take every precaution to eliminate hazards while driving. Now imagine if instead, they graded you based solely on the number of accidents you got in while driving. That doesn’t really seem like an effective way to determine how safe a driver is, does it?

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May Safety Awareness: Respiratory Hazards on the Jobsite

By Rob Wylie, Assistant Director of Safety

May is Safety Month, and as a follow up to Safety Week and our last blog post, we wanted to share some information about respirable hazards. Construction workers may potentially be exposed to respirable hazards on the job site – silica, asbestos, or others like isocyanates. Respirable hazards can pose a multitude of health issues when inhaled, varying from airway irritation to severe cancers. Learn More May Safety Awareness: Respiratory Hazards on the Jobsite

Safety Week 2018: Eliminate the Hazards

By Bart Wilder, Vice President Safety

Every May, we take part in Safety Week — a chance for contractors around the world to come together to celebrate our ongoing dedication to eliminate injury from job sites. Each year, we develop a company-specific theme for the week to highlight an idea or a practice that helps us work safer. Because our safety culture is focused around the idea of eliminating the hazards, we decided to make our theme this year simply, “Eliminate the Hazards,” which we believe is the most important safety message we can promote. Learn More Safety Week 2018: Eliminate the Hazards

Preparing Construction Sites for Extreme Weather

By Hoar Construction’s Safety Team

Working in the Southeast requires that we be ready for extreme weather, especially during the fall months when the Atlantic hurricane season hits full force. This year has been no exception. With three named hurricanes – Harvey, Irma, and Nate – hitting the U.S. mainland, we had our share of making sure our sites and offices were ready. Learn More Preparing Construction Sites for Extreme Weather

Hurricane Season: Ways to be Prepared for Fall Storms

By Hoar Construction

Tropical Storm Emily, which soaked the West Coast of Florida Monday, was a reminder we’re heading into peak hurricane season in the Atlantic. While hurricane season runs June 1 through Nov. 30, we generally see the most activity August through October. This is also the time when many of our project teams start watching the weather more closely. Learn More Hurricane Season: Ways to be Prepared for Fall Storms

Improving Safety Meetings with the 90% Rule

By Michael Barnes

The relentless pursuit of improvement is a core value and a priority for our entire company. Our field teams, management teams, accounting, and IT departments are all committed to finding new ways to work more efficiently, reduce waste, improve quality – any opportunity to do our jobs better. This dedication to improvement is extremely important when it comes to the safety of our employees.

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Severe Weather Safety

By Michael Barnes

We’ve been talking a lot about safety over the past month. As a company, we work very hard to create a culture of safety. One of the ways we’ve been focusing on that is by having a safety moment at every meeting we have. Those safety moments often focus on our actual construction work at a jobsite, but they also include topics that cross our worlds, like ladder safety, applicable to our home life and even our office life!

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Five Common Precursors to an Accident

By Rob Wylie, Assistant Safety Director

This month, Hoar devoted a week to focus on safety and find ways to work smarter and eliminate hazards. I want to challenge everyone to continue to look for ways to eliminate hazards, every day. One way to do that, is to be aware of the five most common precursors to an accident. If we spot one of these red flags, we need to stop, treat it like a violation or a hazard, and take the extra time to be certain we prevent an accident or incident.

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